Wild horses

Horses graze on Nov. 10 at the Bureau of Land management facility in Rock Springs. Though the public viewing kiosk at the nearby overlook remains open, the facility remains closed as the wild horses that were rounded up acclimate and receive veterinary evaluation and care. The BLM said health checks will provide a healthy environment for the horses. After acclimating to their new environment at the facility, the horses will be branded, vaccinated and wormed in preparation for adoption in 2020.

ROCK SPRINGS – Wild horse populations in herd management areas, including Adobe Town, surpass target management levels by thousands of animals, according to numbers released by the Bureau of Land Management.

When you combine the population estimates of the Adobe Town, White Mountain, Great Divide, Salt Wells Creek and Little Colorado HMAs and subtract the low management range, the BLM believes there are 1,995 excess animals currently and will be 2,702 excess horses in 2020. The latter number is about double the maximum appropriate management level (AML).

The public has until Dec. 20 to submit feedback on an environmental assessment regarding a multiyear roundup plan and tools to suppress population growth, such as fertility control.

The BLM said that aerial surveys found that horse populations in all of the HMAs have exceeded their AML in 2019. The issue is expected to continue, as the 2020 population estimate is calculated by adding the estimated foal crop, or 20%, to the 2019 survey count.

The BLM has prepared multiple options for the next roundup, which is expected to take place in the summer or fall of 2020:

-- Gather and remove excess wild horses and apply fertility control to a group of mares that will be returned to the HMAs. The goal is to establish a 60% to 40% male-to-female ratio.

-- Gather and remove excess wild horses, spay a group of mares and neuter a group of studs to be released back into the HMAs. Apply fertility control to the remaining mares released into the HMAs.

-- Gather and remove excess wild horses without taking additional steps to suppress population growth.

-- Take no action or do not conduct roundups or apply fertility control.

Written comments may be submitted through https://go.usa.gov/xpaEN or by emailing blm_wy_rsfo_wildhorse_hmas@blm.gov. For more information on this project, contact BLM Wild Horse Specialist Jay D’Ewart at 307-352-0331.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.